Label GMO Foods

IN THE DARK — The U.S. remains one of only two industrialized countries without mandatory GMO labeling. While some major grocery stores, like Whole Foods, have committed to label foods containing genetically modified ingredients, labeling GMO foods shouldn’t be the exception—it should be the law.

THE RIGHT TO KNOW WHAT WE’RE EATING

We require manufacturers to list ingredients and other nutrition information on food packaging. We now use this information to make responsible food choices. More than 60 countries, including the entire European Union, already require GMO labeling, but in the U.S., consumers are still denied this basic information. Whether or not you are concerned about GMOs, the choice of whether to eat them belongs to the consumer.

CONCERNS ABOUT GMOS

Most of the food available on store shelves contains genetically modified ingredients—and it’s not without risk. Crops that are genetically modified are designed for increased pesticides and herbicides, which have been linked to serious health impacts. The American Medical Association recommends mandatory pre-market safety testing of GMOs but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration continues to rely on voluntary safety assessments using industry data.

WE CAN BEAT BIG AG

Monsanto and other giant agribusinesses are spending millions to oppose labeling efforts—Big Ag and other food giants have spent more than $75 million against labeling initiatives in Oregon, Colorado, Washington and California. But we can overcome Big Ag: polls show that more than 90 percent of the public supports labeling GMOs. Connecticut, Maine, and Vermont all passed GMO labeling laws. With people increasingly concerned about food choices and taking charge of their health, it is time to pass a GMO food labeling law in Massachusetts.


Testimonies for Transparency:
Massachusetts Legislative GMO Labeling Leaders

 
Thank you to the following legislators for submitting photo testimonies.
Senators: Michael Barrett, Harriette Chandler, Cynthia Creem, Sal DiDomenico, Kenneth Donnelly, Benjamin Downing, James Eldridge, Ryan Fattman, Jennifer Flanagan, Robert Hedlund, Donald Humason, Patricia Jehlen, Brian Joyce, Eric Lesser, Jason Lewis, Barbara L'Italien, Joan Lovely, Mark Montigny, Michael Moore, Kathleen O'Connor Ives, Bruce Tarr, Dan Wolf
Representatives: Brian Ashe, Cory Atkins, Ruth Balser, Jennifer Benson, Nicholas Boldyga, Paul Brodeur, Antonio Cabral, Edward Coppinger, Brendan Crighton, Claire Cronin, Daniel Cullinane, Mark Cusack, Josh Cutler, Michael Day, Marjorie Decker, Angelo D'Emilia, Marcos Devers, Geoffrey Diehl, Stephen DiNatale, Daniel Donahue, Paul Donato, Michelle DuBois, James Dwyer, Carolyn Dykema, Lori Ehrlich, Tricia Farley-Bouvier, Ann-Margaret Ferrante, Michael Finn, Carole Fiola, Gloria Fox, William Galvin, Sean Garballey, Denise Garlick,  Susan Williams Gifford, Thomas Golden, Kenneth Gordon, Jonathan Hecht, Paul Heroux, Bradford Hill, Steven Howitt, Bradley Jones, Louis Kafka, Jay Kaufman, Mary Keefe, Peter Kocok, Robert Koczera, Stephen Kulik, John Lawn, David Linsky, Jay Livingstone, Mark Madaro, Timothy Madden, Elizabeth Malia, Brian Mannal, Paul Mark, Christopher Markey, Joseph McGonagle, Paul McMurtry, James Miceli, Aaron Michlewitz, Rady Mom, Frank Moran, Michael Moran, David Nangle, Sarah Peake, Thomas Petrolati, Smitty Pignatelli, Elizabeth Poirier, Denise Provost, Angelo Puppolo, Jeffrey Roy, Byron Rushing, John Scibak, Frank Smizik, Todd Smola, Ellen Story, Timothy Toomey, Paul Tucker, Aaron Vega, John Velis, RoseLee Vincent, Chris Walsh, Susannah Whipps Lee

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